As artificial intelligence (AI) grows in prevalence and accessibility, it is important for employers to consider the implications of its use by their employees. One method of anticipating and quelling potential liabilities that may arise is through deploying certain internal AI policies. This article focuses on certain issues employers should strongly consider when drafting and

Meta Platforms (parent company of Facebook) and OpenAI (creator of ChatGPT) have individually filed a Motion to Dismiss the class-action lawsuit filed by comedian Sarah Silverman and authors Richard Kadrey and Christopher Golden for alleged copyright infringement. These lawsuits highlight the potential legal consequences industry leading AI technologies will begin to face as these technologies

The U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia recently found that human prompting of AI-generated works does not satisfy the “authorship” requirement for copyright protection. Under the Copyright Act of 1976, copyright protection attaches “immediately” upon the creation of “original works of authorship fixed in any tangible medium of expression,” provided those works meet

Comedian Sarah Silverman and authors Richard Kadrey and Christopher Golden recently filed class-action lawsuits against Meta Platforms (parent company of Facebook) and ChatGPT maker OpenAI (backed by Microsoft Corp.) for allegedly using their copyrighted content without authorization to train artificial intelligence (AI) language models. Meta and OpenAI’s AI language models, known as large language models